Harrowing Of Hell

Good Friday 2014

April 18, 2014, The Rev. Kate Wesch preaching

When we chase away the darkness, we miss out on opportunities to experience God and God’s creation in a myriad of ways. Our streetlights rob us of seeing the stars. Our screens keep us from engaging one another. Our constant stream of lights trailing before and behind us, inhibit us from even noticing God in the dark places of our lives. Tonight is a night for darkness. In these hours between now and Easter, I invite you to step into the darkness. Let it surround and envelop you. And while you are there, pray; listen and pray.

Maundy Thursday 2014

April 17, 2014, The Rev. Kate Wesch preaching

How do you know a Christian when you see one? When you meet someone at your child’s school, at a new job, or in your book group, how do they know you are a Christian before you even tell them? Upon meeting someone new in Seattle, you probably don’t lead with a testimonial or invite them to church….that comes later, if at all. It is likely that you don’t even reveal that you are a church goer until you know them quite well. So, how do they know?

Maundy Thursday 2013

March 28, 2013, The Rev Kate Wesch preaching

On this one night of the year, we remember in our words and actions, a most dramatic and pivotal moment in scripture. The night Jesus gathered at table with his disciples for a final meal and once again re-ordered the structures of power through simple, – profound acts.

Christ the King and Truth

November 25, 2012, The Rev Kate Wesch preaching

There are no raccoons or pledge cards or hives in this sermon – no reflections on money or pain or suffering. BUT, there is a debate about royalty and jurisdiction. There is conversation about the Kingdom of God. And, there are statements about TRUTH.

Maundy Thursday 2012

April 5, 2012, The Rev. Kate Wesch preaching

On this one night of the year, we remember in our words and actions, a most dramatic and pivotal moment in scripture. The night Jesus gathered at table with his friends for a final meal and once again re-ordered the structures of power through simple, – profound acts.

Jesus had already had a final meal with his beloved friends Mary, Martha, and Lazarus at their home in Bethany. Now, he is saying goodbye to his disciples – the ones who have been with him every step of the way. But, his goodbye isn’t trite or melodramatic; rather, it is deliberate and sacramental and comes from a place of deep and abiding love.

Jesus, the Messiah, the Son of God, a rabbi and teacher, a friend, is saying good bye through these simple (but revolutionary) acts of breaking bread and washing feet.